VLT, HEAT BLOCK, INFRARED HEAT BLOCK, and UV PROTECTION reading on our Window Tints 02.12.2020

 

Carbon Tints

VLT           HB          IRB          UVB

49CN       30            09             99

43CN       35            09             99

30CN       40            09             99

Nano Ceramic Tints

VLT           HB          IRB          UVB

48C          70            76             99

43C          70            75             99

38C          70            75             99

31C          70            78             99

27C          77            78             99

20C          75            75             99

05C          80            75             99

Ultra Nano Ceramic Tints

VLT          HB          IRB          UVB

39U          80            86             99

22U          82.5         87             99

Privacy Glass Tints

VLT          HB          IRB          UVB

86C          20            38             99

82U          52            68             99

72C          50            83             99

66U          70            81             99

CLEAR SAFETY

VLT          HB          IRB          UVB

   90CS        05            10             65  

VLT=Visible Light Transmittance

 

HB=Heat Block

 

IRB=Infra Red Block

 

UVB=Ultra Violet Block

 

C=Nano Ceramic

U= Ultra

CN= Carbon

 

CS=Clear Safety

VISIBLE LIGHT TRANSMITTANCE = VLT

A VLT meter will measure the amount of light is transmitted between an item or object, like for example a piece of glass, or a window tint. This measurement is used to determine how dark or light and window tint is.

Our method for testing how much light our window tints will block, or reduce are:

1) turn on the VLT meter, and wait for it to automatically calibrate

2) place the window tint between the measuring area of the VLT meter device

3) note down the percentage (%) reading on the VLT meter

 

TINT HEAT BLOCK PERFORMANCE TESTS
Our two methods of testing how much heat in the air our window Tints will block from direct sunlight


method #1 using a BTU meter
1) point the BTU meter directly to the Sun and note the reading on the meter
2) place the window tint between the sun and the BTU meter reader, and again, note down the meter reading
3) calculate the BTU difference between the first and second reading, and then convert this to a percentage (%)

 

method #2 using a BTU meter
1) point the BTU meter directly to a heat lamp and note the reading on the meter
2) place the window tint between the heat lamp and the BTU meter reader, and again, note down the meter reading
3) calculate the BTU difference between the first and second reading, and then convert this to a percentage (%)

method #3 using a BTU meter

1) turn on the BTU meter, and wait for it to automatically calibrate

2) place the window tint between the measuring area of the BTU device

3) note down the percentage (%) reading on the meter

 

Our method of testing how much Infrared heat our window Tints will block. This test is important to determine how much less heat you will feel burning your skin that's caused by the Sun.
 

method #1 using an IR meter
1) turn on the IR meter, and wait for it to automatically calibrate
2) place the window tint between the measuring area of the IR device
3) note down the percentage (%) reading on the meter

Ultra Violet Radiation = UVR

UVR are the well known invisible rays from the sun, that can be harmful to humans

method #1 using an UV meter

1) point the UV meter directly to the Sun and note the reading on the meter
2) place the window tint between the sun and the UV meter reader, and again, note down the meter reading
3) calculate the UVR difference between the first and second reading, and then convert this to a percentage (%)

 

method #2 using a UV meter
1) point the UV meter directly to a heat lamp and note the reading on the meter
2) place the window tint between the heat lamp and the UV meter reader, and again, note down the meter reading
3) calculate the UVR difference between the first and second reading, and then convert this to a percentage (%)

method #3 using a UV meter

1) turn on the UV meter, and wait for it to automatically calibrate

2) place the window tint between the measuring area of the UV device

3) note down the percentage (%) reading on the meter

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HEAT AND INFRARED HEAT

Heat from direct sunlight is created in different ways depending on a variety of factors, however, there are two main ways that the Sun will significantly cause the temperature to rise. One of the ways is the fact that different objects will attract, absorb and reflect heat in different ways, and the second, is the fact that the light from the Sun will heat the air.

 

Heat in the air that is created by sunlight can be measured with a BTU meter, or a kW heat meter.
This specialised equipment is designed to be pointed directly at the sun, or a heat lamp, to measure the heat in the air.
BTU = British Thermal Units
kW = kilowatt.

On the other hand, an IR tint meter will measure how much a window tint or other object like a piece of glass will transfer or block Infrared heat.
IR heat created by the Sun does not heat the air, but instead will heat a physical body, and all other objects that will absorb heat, like for example, your skin, clothes, a steering wheel, metal, leather ect. 
IR = Infrared

Note:

a) All photos on this page are for illustration purposes only and should only be used as a guide.

b) Percentage numbers and values are only estimates, and can vary up to 5% either way.

c) Shades available are measures with a Visible Light Transmitter meter. The lower this number is, the darker shade of tint. For example: A 35% tint is lighter than a 5% tint)

d) Heat and IR heat block are measured with BTU and Infra Red meter. The higher this number is, the more heat this tint will block. For example: A 60% heat, or IR heat block, is 20% less than a window tint that blocks 80%.

e) Heat and IR block are estimates of all shades in that particular range if window tint. In most cases, the lighter shades will block slightly less than a darker shade. For example: A Nano Ceramic 49% shade of tint, will block 65% of Heat, compared to a Nano Ceramic 5% shade of tint , will block 75% of Heat.  

d) All values on this page will update on a regular basis and will be in accordance to our new stock on hand, and tests conducted.